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How to of the Day

How to of the Day


How to Cut Memory Foam

Posted: 03 Aug 2019 09:00 AM PDT

Memory foam is a common material used for mattresses and pillows since it's comfortable and it conforms to your body. If you have a piece of memory foam that's too large, you can easily cut it at home with an electric carving knife. Be sure to double check your measurements before you make your cut so you don't make a mistake. When you're finished, you'll have a piece of memory foam that's the perfect size!

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Measuring and Marking the Foam

  1. Remove the slipcover if you're cutting a memory foam mattress. Many new memory foam mattresses have a slipcover on top for an additional layer of protection. Look for a zipper around the edge of the mattress and unzip it as far as you can. Once the zipper is undone, pull the edges of the slipcover off of the mattress and remove it. Since you're cutting mattress, you can either throw away the slipcover or use the material to make a new slipcover.[1]
    Cut Memory Foam Step 1.jpg
    • If there isn't a zipper around the edge of the slipcover, then you may need to cut it off with a knife or pair of scissors.
  2. Check the dimensions you need and add to them. Use a tape measure to double check the height, width, and depth for the foam you need for your project. For example, you may measure a mattress if you're cutting a memory foam topper, or you may find the dimensions of a pillowcase if you're making a pillow. Add to each measurement you take since cutting the foam could remove some of the material.[2]
    Cut Memory Foam Step 2.jpg
  3. Mark the memory foam with a permanent marker and a tape measure. Hold the end of your tape measure at the edge of your piece of memory foam and pull it out until you reach the correct length. Draw a dot on the memory foam with a permanent marker at the end of your measurement. Move your tape measure along the edge of the mattress by and make another dot so it's in line with the first one. Continue marking the memory foam until you reach the other side. Repeat the process for any other dimensions you plan on cutting.[3]
    Cut Memory Foam Step 3.jpg
    • Double check your measurements to make sure they're accurate, or else you may make a crooked cut.
  4. Draw your cut lines on the foam with a marker. Set a straightedge on top of the memory foam so it crosses the marks you made for your measurements. Use a permanent marker to draw your lines between the measurements so you know where to make your cuts. Make the lines thin so your cuts and measurements are precise.[4]
    Cut Memory Foam Step 4.jpg
    • If you're drawing a curved line, use a round object as a stencil, such as a coffee can or a bowl.

[Edit]Making Your Cuts

  1. Set the foam on a table so the side you're cutting hangs over the edge. Find a flat, sturdy table to set your memory foam on. Position the memory foam on the table so your cut lines overhang the edge of the table. That way, you won't damage the tabletop when you cut through the foam.[5]
    Cut Memory Foam Step 5.jpg
    • Set a heavy object on a piece of memory foam to help hold it in place if it tips over the edge. Make sure the object is at least from your cut line so the foam doesn't compress.
  2. Hold an electric carving knife perpendicular to the memory foam. Plug in your electric carving knife and hold it with your dominant hand. Position the knife so the blade is at a 90-degree angle to the edge you're cutting to make a smooth, straight cut. Make sure the serrated edge is touching the memory foam and lines up with the line you drew.[6]
    Cut Memory Foam Step 6.jpg
    • You can buy an electric carving knife from any kitchen supply store or online.
    • An electric knife will give you the smoothest cut, but you can also use a serrated bread knife if you don't have an electric one.
  3. Guide the knife along the line you drew on the foam. Turn on your electric carving knife and slowly follow along the marker line. Keep your knife perpendicular to the foam so your cut isn't crooked. Avoid pushing down on the foam while you're cutting since it could deform and make your cut inaccurate. Continue pushing the blade through the foam along the line until you cut through its entire length. When you need to pull the knife blade out of the foam, turn it off before removing it.[7]
    Cut Memory Foam Step 7.jpg
    • Keep your fingers and the knife cord away from the blade while it's running so you don't hurt yourself.
    • If you're using a serrated bread knife, saw back and forth to make your cuts.
  4. Cut along the line again if the blade didn't go through the foam. If you're cutting through a thick piece of memory foam, your knife blade may not cut through it completely. Put the carving knife blade at the end of the cut again and follow along the line again. Work slowly so your cut stays straight and accurate. Continue doing multiple passes over the cut until the blade goes completely through the foam. Repeat the process for any other dimensions you need to cut from the memory foam. [8]
    Cut Memory Foam Step 8.jpg
    • You can also flip the piece of foam over to the other side and take your measurements again. Cut through the memory foam so your 2 cuts meet in the middle.

[Edit]Tips

  • You can use a razor knife or serrated bread knife if you want, but it won't make as clean of a cut.[9]

[Edit]Warnings

  • Keep your fingers and the knife cord away from the blade while it's turned on.

[Edit]Things You'll Need

  • Tape measure
  • Marker
  • Straightedge
  • Table
  • Electric carving knife

[Edit]References

How to Dye a Lacrosse Head

Posted: 03 Aug 2019 01:00 AM PDT

Dyeing your lacrosse head is a great way to give your stick a personalized, distinctive look! Many players at every level play with dyed sticks. Not only can it bring new life to an old stick, it can draw lots of attention on the field and give your game a new attitude. There are multiple ways to approach dyeing a lacrosse head. If this is your first time, try dyeing the head 1 color. If you're ready to try something more advanced, add a marbling pattern or create stripes with pieces of duct tape. Or, use 2 colors of dye to create a 2-toned effect on the head.

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Cleaning and Preparing the Head

  1. Scrub a used lacrosse head with a sponge and dish soap. If you've already played a few games with the lacrosse head, it's likely covered in grass or dirt stains. You should clean these off before dyeing the head, or the dye job will turn out poorly. Fill your sink up with warm water and 1-2 squirts of dish soap. Scrub the head with a sponge until all of the grass marks and dirt stains have come off.[1]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 1 Version 2.jpg
    • If you're using a clean, new lacrosse head, you won't need to wash it before dyeing.
  2. Select 1-2 colors of dye to color the lacrosse head. Pick up a couple colors that complement one another or that match your team's colors. For example, you could dye the head red and blue, black and yellow, or red and green.[2] You'll be able to find lacrosse head dye at most large athletic-supply stores. If they're sold out, you may be able to find the dye at a lacrosse specialty store if there's one in your area.
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 2 Version 2.jpg
    • If this is your first time dyeing a lacrosse head, stick with 1 color until you've gotten some dyeing experience.
  3. Remove the string from the lacrosse head. Untie the small knots that hold the string netting to the lacrosse head and set the string net aside. This will keep the string itself from being dyed when you color the head. Set the string aside for now.
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 3 Version 2.jpg
    • Some people may want to dye the pocket of their lacrosse head, in which case you can leave the string in! But, this approach is pretty uncommon.
  4. Place duct tape over parts of the head you want to remain uncolored. Tear off a few strips of duct tape and wrap them around any spots on the plastic lacrosse head that you'd like to remain uncolored. Remember that the spots you're about to tape are going to remain white when the stick is complete. You can get as creative with this as you like! For example, try cutting star or triangle shapes out of the duct tape and spacing them out along the lacrosse head to give it a creative pattern.[3]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 4 Version 2.jpg
    • If you want the numbers or your team name on the lacrosse head to remain undyed, cover them with tape. Or, if you want to dye the head in a striped pattern, alternate taped and non-taped sections along the length of the head.
    • On the other hand, if you'd like to dye the entire lacrosse head 1 color—whether or not you're using the marbling technique—you can skip using tape.

[Edit]Soaking the Head in a Dye Bath

  1. Boil water on the stove to warm up the lacrosse head dye. Fill a large metal pot or other heat-proof container with of tap water. Heat the water on your stovetop range until it's boiling. Keep the water on medium-high heat so it maintains a steady, rolling boil throughout the dyeing process. If you plan on using 2 colors of dye, boil 2 large pots of water.[4]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 5 Version 2.jpg
    • If you're only using 1 color, you only need to boil 1 large pot of water.
    • Select a container that is large and durable enough to withstand the heat of boiling water. An old kitchen pot that the family is no longer using is a good option.
  2. Pour 1 container of dye into each pot of boiling water. Once the water is at a smooth, rolling boil, open your container(s) of lacrosse-head dye. Dump a full container into each of the pots of water. Stir the dye and water mixture with a wooden spoon to make sure the color is evenly diluted throughout the water.[5]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 6 Version 2.jpg
    • If you've dyed lacrosse heads before this, you can experiment with the color dilution a little. For example, if you want 1 of the 2 colors you're using to be lighter than the other, only pour 1/2 of the liquid dye into the pot of boiling water.
    • Keep in mind that the spoon you use will probably end up dyed after you stir the dye and water mixture!
  3. Dip the lacrosse head into the boiling dye mixture for 20-30 seconds. Pick up the lacrosse head with a pair of kitchen tongs so you won't risk burning your fingers. Lower the lacrosse head into the boiling water and dye mixture, and leave it in the water for at least 20 seconds. Lift the head out of the water once the 20-30 seconds have passed, and let it drip dry for about 10 seconds.[6]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 7.jpg
    • If you'd like the head to have a dark color, leave the head in the dye for longer—try 30 seconds for a very dark hue.
    • Don't let the lacrosse head rest against the hot bottom of the pot, or you'll risk melting the head. Grasp the head with the tongs the entire time it's in the dye.
    • The dye will not change the color of the webbing spray that you applied earlier, if you chose to create a marbling effect on the head.

[Edit]Applying Marbling Spray

  1. Shake the can of webbing paint spray vigorously before using. Before you spray the paint onto the lacrosse head, give it 15-20 shakes up and down. This will mix the spray paint in the can. If you forget to shake the can, the webbing paint will come out unevenly and may not look very good on the dyed head.[7]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 8.jpg
    • Since it's almost always black, the webbing paint will not take the color of liquid dye once you dye the lacrosse head.
    • Purchase a can of webbing paint spray at any craft or hobby-supply store. It comes in a variety of colors—including black, red, green, and purple—so pick out whichever color you'd like.
  2. Prop the lacrosse head in front of a sheet of newspaper. You can also set it up on a piece of disposable cardboard if you have cardboard around your home. The webbing spray that you'll use to create the marbling pattern on your lacrosse head can get pretty messy, so cover at least a area. Place the head at the center of the newspaper covering.[8]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 9.jpg
    • You can use marbling in combination with the duct-tape color blocking, or you can skip those steps and just use the marbling technique. It's up to you; you can be as creative as you like when coloring your lacrosse head!
  3. Spray webbing paint spray across the lacrosse head. Hold a can of webbing paint spray away from the lacrosse head. Depress the button on top of the can to spray out the paint. It'll come out in an uneven, web-like spray. Move the spray nozzle back and forth so that the spray covers the entirety of the head. Let the webbing paint dry for about 2 hours before you dye it in your liquid dye mixture.[9]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 10.jpg
    • If you're not sure whether or not the paint is dry, try tapping it with 1-2 fingers. If your fingers come away wet, give the paint another 30 minute to dry.

[Edit]Dyeing the Head a Second Color

  1. Cover new parts of the head with tape if you'd like to preserve the color. If you are dying the head a second color, then you need to leave the tape on the head that you placed on there before to keep the white parts of the stick. Now, before dipping the full head into the second color, add more tape to keep parts of the head the color that you just dyed them. Move from using your darkest color to using your lightest color, so that the second color doesn't overpower the first color.
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 11.jpg
    • For example, say that you're dyeing the first half the head red and the second half of it blue. If you don't want any overlap between the colors—which would give the middle of the head a purple hue—cover the red part closest to the middle with duct tape.
    • This will keep the red color intact and prevent the blue from changing the red.
  2. Dip the head into a second color of dye. If you're dying the lacrosse head more than 1 color, hold the partially-dyed head with your tongs again and dip it into the second color. As before, keep the head in the water for 20-30 seconds to let the dye soak into the plastic. Since you're using a darker color, you may not need to dye the head for much longer than 20 seconds.[10]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 12.jpg
    • As with the first color, suspend the head over the boiling water for 10-15 seconds once it's dyed to allow excess dye to drip off.
    • An easy way to have a 2-colored lacrosse head is to only dip the top half of the lacrosse head in 1 color for 30 seconds. Then, flip the head over and dip its lower half in the second color of dye for another 30 seconds.
  3. Remove the duct tape stripes or pattern once the head has cooled. Use your fingernails or the point of a knife blade to lift up the edges of the pieces of duct tape that you applied earlier. The patches of plastic under the tape should still be white.[11]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 13.jpg
    • Keep in mind that you can still dye the lacrosse head 2 colors without using duct tape.
    • If you opted not to use any duct tape, you can skip this step.
  4. Rinse the head off with cool water once it's fully dyed. Once the head is dyed, place it immediately under the tap of the sink under ice-cold water. This will wash off all the remaining dye and will prevent it from bleeding back onto the string. Rinsing the stick with cool water also cures the stick, meaning that the dye will not bleed off of it and onto your hands.[12]
    Dye a Lacrosse Head Step 14.jpg
    • Instead of rinsing the lacrosse head under the faucet, you could also fill a large baking tray with cold water and submerge the head in the tray for 30 seconds.

[Edit]Things You'll Need

  • Sponge
  • Dish soap
  • White, plastic lacrosse head
  • RIT liquid dye
  • Webbing spray (optional)
  • Newspaper
  • Duct tape
  • Large metal pot
  • Wooden spoon
  • Tongs

[Edit]Tips

  • If you find that the duct tape isn't sticking to the plastic lacrosse head very well, try blowing warm air across the tape with a heat gun or blow dryer. This will strengthen the adhesive and help the tape stick better.[13]
  • When dying a goalie head, double the amount of dye that you use. Since a goalie head is much larger than a field-stick head, you'd end up with a lightly-dyed head if you used the same amount of dye as for an ordinary field-stick.

[Edit]References

How to Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically

Posted: 02 Aug 2019 05:00 PM PDT

Aphids are small, sap-eating insects that are attracted to roses. While most plants can handle a few aphids without suffering any permanent damage, you may need to take action against aphid infestations if they're damaging or killing your roses. Watering your plants daily is a simple step that you can take to keep aphids off of your plants while keeping them healthy. If watering doesn't prove to be enough, you can introduce predators of the aphid to your garden. If this also proves to be ineffective, you can coat your plants in an organic repellent using soap, garlic, or neem oil.

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Watering Your Plants Daily

  1. Clip off brown or dying leaves, stems, and petals. Aphids occasionally lay eggs in discolored sections of a plant, so snip them off and throw them out to prevent any future generations of aphids from making it to your garden. You may also want to remove any leaves, stems, or petals that have been heavily damaged by the aphids. If a petal or leaf is covered in tiny little holes, trim it off.[1]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 1 Version 3.jpg
  2. Spray your roses with a spray bottle or hose in the morning. Spray your roses with a wide-angle hose attachment first thing in the morning. Set the nozzle on your hose to keep the water flowing as firmly as possible without damaging your roses. While they are obnoxious, aphids aren't particularly nimble or strong. Send the aphids careening into different parts of your garden by hosing them down with water.[2]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 2 Version 3.jpg
    • Most aphids do not have wings and will be unable to get back on the rose shrubs once the water rinses them off.
  3. Water the underside of the rose leaves carefully. Aphids tend to hang out underneath the leaves on a rose plant to stay out of the sun. While watering your plant, place your nozzle low to the ground and angle it upwards to hit the bottom of your plant's leaves and knock off any aphids that are hiding.[3]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 3 Version 3.jpg
    • Water the plant from every direction to make sure that you get the underside of every leaf and petal.
  4. Repeat this process every day to prevent new aphids from settling in. Water your roses first thing in the morning for 1-2 weeks. After several days of repeated watering, you should notice that the aphids are either entirely gone, or moving on to another plant. If they aren't, you may want to consider introducing a predator.[4]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 4 Version 3.jpg

[Edit]Introducing Predators to Feed on Aphids

  1. Purchase some ladybugs and release them into your garden at night. Purchase 250-1,500 ladybugs from a gardening or pest control store. Refrigerate your bugs for 20-45 minutes and release them late at night to lower the chance that they fly away immediately when you release them. Ladybugs feed on aphids, and a few ladybugs can go along way when it comes to eliminating pests.[5]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 5 Version 3.jpg
    • Place your bugs around the base of your rose bushes and wait for them to wake up a little before they get to work.
    • Mist the ladybugs with warm water after you drop them off to incentivize them to stay in your garden. Ladybugs prefer humid environments, so a little water will help keep them in your garden.
  2. Set up some bird feeders around your garden to attract birds. Consider using this option only if you don't want more bugs in your garden. If you don't want to add bugs, set up a few bird feeders around your garden. Add some bird baths and bird houses to make your garden an attractive spot for birds. Wrens, chickadees, and other small birds all love to eat aphids, although it may take them some time to get all of them. [6]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 6 Version 3.jpg
    • Try to plant a range of birdhouses and birdfeeders around your rose bushes so that the entire perimeter is covered.
  3. Plant nectar-secreting flowers near your roses to attract predators. Plant some nectar-secreting flowers within of your roses. The nectar will attract predatory insects, which will stick around your garden looking for prey. If your flowers are close enough to your roses, they'll start feeding on the aphids. Lacewings, hover flies, and wasps are all natural predators of the aphid. They also happen to be attracted to nectar-secreting flowers, like cosmos or stonecrop. [7]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 7 Version 3.jpg
    • If you ever use a pesticide in your garden, you will end up killing the beneficial bugs too.
    • Predatory wasps will sting you. Try to coexist peacefully with wasps, but if you end up with a nest nearby, you may need to get rid of it.
    • Catnip, oregano, fennel, and mint will all attract predatory insects.

[Edit]Creating an Organic Repellant

  1. Create a garlic spray to make a safe repellent. Crush a full head of garlic with a mortar and pestle and steep it in of hot water for 24 hours. Strain the garlic with a colander and fill a spray bottle with your garlic-infused water. Add of dish soap and put the cap on before shaking it. Spray every section of your rose plant 2-3 times until it's fully misted in the spray.[8]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 8 Version 3.jpg
    • Your garlic spray won't kill any bugs. It will simply make the plant unappealing for aphids and other pests.
    • Make sure that you spray the underside of leaves as well.
  2. Spray your roses with neem oil to kill aphids and protect your plants. Get a spray bottle filled with pure neem oil and spray your aphid-infested plants 2-3 times. Neem oil is a natural pesticide that is distilled from plant seeds, and it will coat the aphids and prevent them from feeding or laying larvae.[9]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 9 Version 3.jpg
    • Neem oil won't damage your plants, but it will repel any beneficial bugs as well. Avoid using neem oil if you've already released ladybugs or attracted other predators to your garden.
  3. Try a simple soap and water mixture for mild infestations. Mix in a spray bottle filled with warm water. Shake the bottle to mix it and spray your infected plants from every direction. Use the widest nozzle setting on your bottle to prevent adding a lot of soap to a small surface area. The soap-water mixture will harm the aphids and ward them away from your roses.[10]
    Get Rid of Aphids on Roses Organically Step 10 Version 3.jpg
    • Don't use water and soap if it's hotter than outside. Your plants will absorb the soap before it has time to evaporate.

[Edit]Things You'll Need

[Edit]Watering Your Plants Daily

  • Spray bottle or hose

[Edit]Introducing Predators to Feed on Aphids

  • Ladybugs
  • Bird feed
  • Birdfeeder
  • Birdhouse
  • Birdbath
  • Nectar-secreting flower

[Edit]Creating an Organic Repellant

  • Garlic
  • Colander
  • Mortar and pestle
  • Dish soap
  • Neem oil
  • Spray bottle

[Edit]References

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